Ursula
Ursula

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Anthony
Anthony

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sold

IMG_1905.JPG
Cecil
Cecil

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Cecil Taylor (b. 1929; d. 2018) was an American pianist and poet, generally known as having been one of the pioneers of free jazz. Taylor combined jazz influences, modern classical music and African traditions to create a distinctive and defiantly individual style.

Tarana Burke
Tarana Burke

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Tarana Burke (b. 1973) is a civil rights activist from The Bronx, New York who founded the Me Too movement.

In 2006, Burke began using the phrase "Me Too" to raise awareness of the pervasiveness of sexual abuse and assault in society. The phrase developed into a broader movement following the 2017 use of #MeToo as a hashtag following the Harvey Weinstein sexual abuse allegations.

In 2017 Time named Burke, among a group of other prominent female activists dubbed "the silence breakers", as the Time Person of the Year. Burke received The Ridenhour Prize for Courage in 2018.

This movement is about making sure survivors have the resources to heal AFTER they’ve said #metoo, it’s about galvanizing a global community or survivors and advocates to do the work of interrupting sexual violence. It’s about protecting folks’ human dignity at all cost.

-- Tarana Burke

Ahed Tamimi
Ahed Tamimi

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21.5’’ by 35’’

available

Ahed Tamimi (b. 2001) is a powerhouse.

A Palestinian activist from the village of Nabi Saleh in the West Bank, she has been fighting against occupation alongside her family since she could walk.

Ahed is currently in Israeli prison for the crime of slapping an Israeli soldier-- hours after another soldier had shot her 15-year-old cousin Muhammad in the head at a nonviolent protest.

The entire Tamimi family is known for its unarmed resistance to Israel’s encroachment on their village of Nabi Saleh.

Rosa
Rosa

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available

Rosa Luxemburg (b. 1871; d. 1919) was a Polish-born German revolutionary Marxist known as a theorist, writer, and activist. Writing through the decades leading up to the successful Russian revolution and her own country’s failed German revolution, she authored books and pamphlets that helped to explain the inner workings of capitalism (The Accumulation of Capital (1913); The Industrial Development of Poland (1989); among others) as well as books and polemics that argued what strategy the revolutionary movement should take (Reform or Revolution (1900); and The Mass Strike, The Political Party, and the Trade Unions (1906) among her most famous.

According to the American professor C. Wright Mills, Rosa "had one foot firmly planted in democracy, the other firmly planted in revolution, and her head very much up in the Marxist clouds of faith in the working class."

In1919 Rosa, along with her close comrade Karl Liebknecht, was murdered in by the proto-Nazi Freikorps who tragically were following the orders of her former party (SPD) whose liberal wing had conceded to counter-revolution.

Clara Zetkin, a close friend and comrade of Rosa wrote:

In Rosa Luxemburg the socialist idea was a dominating and powerful passion of both heart and brain, a truly creative passion which burned ceaselessly. The great task and the overpowering ambition of this astonishing woman was to prepare the way for social revolution, to clear the path of history for Socialism. To experience the revolution, to fight its battles--that was the highest happiness for her. With a will, determination, selflessness and devotion for which words are too weak, she consecrated her whole life and her whole being to Socialism. She gave herself completely to the cause of Socialism, not only in her tragic death, but throughout her whole life, daily and hourly, through the struggles of many years...She was the sharp sword, the living flame of revolution.

Berta Cáceres
Berta Cáceres

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available

Berta Isabel Cáceres Flores (b. 1971; d. 2016) was a Honduran environmental activist, indigenous leader, and co-founder and coordinator of the Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH).

Beginning as a student activist in the 90’s, Berta led campaigns on a wide variety of issues, including protesting illegal logging, plantation owners, and the presence of US military bases on Lenca land. She supported feminism, LGBT rights, as well as wider social and indigenous issues.

In 2006, a group of indigenous Lenca people from Río Blanco asked Cáceres to investigate the recent arrival of construction equipment in their area. Cáceres investigated and informed the community that a joint venture project between Chinese company Sinohydro, the World Bank's International Finance Corporation, and Honduran company Desarrollos Energéticos, S.A. (also known as DESA, see Empresa Nacional de Energía Eléctrica) had plans to construct a series of four hydroelectric dams on the Gualcarque River-- having breached international law (by failing to consult with the local people) in the process.

The Lenca were concerned that the dams would compromise their access to water, food and materials for medicine, and therefore threaten their traditional way of life. Cáceres worked together with the community to mount a protest campaign. She organized legal actions and community meetings against the project, and took the case to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

From 2013, Cáceres led COPINH and the local community in a year-long protest at the construction site to prevent the companies from accessing the land. Security officers regularly removed protesters from the site. In July 2013, the Honduran military opened fire on the protesters, killing one member of COPINH and injuring three others.

In late 2013, both Sinohydro and the International Finance Corporation withdrew from the project because of COPINH's protests. Desarrollos Energéticos (DESA) continued, however, moving the construction site to another location to avoid the blockade. Officials filed criminal charges against Cáceres and two other indigenous leaders for "usurpation, coercion and continued damages" against DESA for their roles in the protest, which was alleged to have incited others to cause damages to the company.

That year, Cáceres told Al Jazeera:

The army has an assassination list of 18 wanted human rights fighters with my name at the top. I want to live, there are many things I still want to do in this world but I have never once considered giving up fighting for our territory, for a life with dignity, because our fight is legitimate. I take lots of care but in the end, in this country where there is total impunity I am vulnerable... When they want to kill me, they will do it.

In 2015 she won the Goldman Environmental Prize for "a grassroots campaign that successfully pressured the world’s largest dam builder to pull out of the Agua Zarca Dam" at the Río Gualcarque.

In 2016, at the age of 44, she was assassinated in her home by armed intruders, after years of threats against her life. A former soldier with the US-trained special forces units of the Honduran military asserted that Caceres' name was on their hitlist months before her assassination. As of February 2017 three of the eight arrested people were linked to the US-trained elite military troops of which two had been trained at Fort Benning, Georgia, USA the former School of the Americas (SOA), renamed WHINSEC, linked to thousands of murders and human right violations by its graduates in Latin America.

Her murder was followed by those of two more activists within the same month.

Jeremy
Jeremy

charcoal on paper

21.5’’ by 35’’

available

Jeremy Okai Davis is a painter living in Portland, Oregon. Much of his work is vibrantly colored, pixel-inspired portraiture. Check out his work at http://work.jeremyokaidavis.com/

Yaser Murtaja
Yaser Murtaja

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21.5’’ by 35’’

available

Yaser Murtaja (b. 1987; d. 2018) was a Palestinian video journalist and photographer from the Gaza Strip.

Murtaja was the co-founder of Ain Media Production Company, which produced video for several international media outlets. Murtaja's journalism focused on covering life in Gaza, covering the Blockade of the Gaza Strip and the Gaza–Israel conflict. He was known for his work on Al Jazeera's Gaza: Surviving Shujayea. The documentary covers Bisan Daher after she survived an Israeli attack on Gaza's Shujayea neighborhood that killed six members of her family.

Murtaja worked as an assistant cameraman on Ai Wei Wei's documentary film, Human Flow. He was also a videographer for Ai Weiwei's Journey of Laziz, a video installation shown in a temporary exhibit at The Israel Museum. He worked with filmmaker Alsharif on "Ouroboros," a film about life in Gaza which premiered at the Locarno Festival in 2017.

Gaza is one of the world's most densely populated areas, with more than 5,000 inhabitants per square kilometre. The Gaza Strip is smaller than the city of Oslo but is home to three times as many people. The population is expected to rise to 2.1 million by 2020. 7 out of 10 Palestinians in Gaza are registered as refugees, and many of these come from families who were forced to leave their villages in 1948. Many have also been forced to leave their homes due to war and violence.

A 2012 UN report predicted the Palestinian enclave would be “unliveable” by 2020 if nothing was done to ease the blockade, but in June 2017 a UN report on living conditions in Gaza stated that all the indicators are going in the wrong direction and that deadline is actually approaching even faster than earlier predicted.

Israel has imposed movement restrictions on the Gaza Strip since the early 1990’s, leaving nearly two million Palestinians in Gaza remain ‘locked in’, denied free access to the remainder of the territory and the outside world. The isolation of Gaza has been exacerbated by restrictions imposed by the Egyptian authorities on Rafah, its single passengers crossing.

In March 2018, under a photo of Gaza's port, Murtaja wrote: "I hope the day that I can take this image when I am in the sky instead of on the ground will come! My name is Yaser, I am 30 years old, live in Gaza City and I have never travelled before in my life!"

On April 6, 2018, Murtaja was covering "The Great March of Return," a six-week campaign of grassroots protests that started March 30 demanding that Palestinian refugees and their descendants be allowed to return to their homeland from which they had to flee during the "Nakba" ("Catastrophe") of 1948, when Israeli armies expelled 700,000 Palestinians and destroyed over 400 Palestinian cities and towns.

Israeli snipers shot and killed Murtaja, even though he was wearing a jacket clearly marked ”PRESS.”

Since March 30 Israeli forces have killed at least 30 Palestinians at the Gaza March of Return protests.

Israel's use of deadly force has been condemned by human rights organizations, including Human Rights Watch, B'Tselem,and Amnesty International, and criticized by United Nations officials.

Murtaja was married and had one child.

Erica Garner
Erica Garner

charcoal on paper

21.5’’ by 35’’

available

Erica Garner is the daughter of Eric Garner, who was murdered by police in New York for selling loose cigarettes, and whose famous last words “I can’t breathe” became a rallying cry for the Black Lives Matter movement.

“I felt the same pain that my father felt on that day when he was screaming, ‘I can’t breathe,’” Erica had said. “When he was saying that he was tired of being harassed.”

Erica became an activist following her father’s death, and came to be a prominent organizer for Black Lives Matter, organizing rallies, die-ins and meetings, and relentlessly fighting against police brutality and for justice for her father.

She died at the age of 27 on December 30, 2017 from a heart attack.

The Rev. Al Sharpton, head of the National Action Network, who delivered the eulogy at First Corinthian Baptist Church in Harlem, said that Ms. Garner’s strongest legacy was "turning her pain into power:”

When her father died, an activist was born. You don’t just accept injustice, you fight.

Her heart was attacked in 2014 when her daddy was choked and begged 11 times for his life and they would never let the grip go. When she saw the tape of her father, that’s when her heart was broken. Whatever attack came came to the pieces that were left.

Crow pair 1.jpg
Ursula
Anthony
IMG_1905.JPG
Cecil
Tarana Burke
Ahed Tamimi
Rosa
Berta Cáceres
Jeremy
Yaser Murtaja
Erica Garner
Crow pair 1.jpg
Ursula

charcoal on paper

21.5 by 35’’

available

Anthony

charcoal on paper

21.5 by 35’’

sold

Cecil

charcoal on paper

21.5’’ by 35’’

sold

Cecil Taylor (b. 1929; d. 2018) was an American pianist and poet, generally known as having been one of the pioneers of free jazz. Taylor combined jazz influences, modern classical music and African traditions to create a distinctive and defiantly individual style.

Tarana Burke

charcoal on paper

21.5’’ by 35’’

available

Tarana Burke (b. 1973) is a civil rights activist from The Bronx, New York who founded the Me Too movement.

In 2006, Burke began using the phrase "Me Too" to raise awareness of the pervasiveness of sexual abuse and assault in society. The phrase developed into a broader movement following the 2017 use of #MeToo as a hashtag following the Harvey Weinstein sexual abuse allegations.

In 2017 Time named Burke, among a group of other prominent female activists dubbed "the silence breakers", as the Time Person of the Year. Burke received The Ridenhour Prize for Courage in 2018.

This movement is about making sure survivors have the resources to heal AFTER they’ve said #metoo, it’s about galvanizing a global community or survivors and advocates to do the work of interrupting sexual violence. It’s about protecting folks’ human dignity at all cost.

-- Tarana Burke

Ahed Tamimi

charcoal on paper

21.5’’ by 35’’

available

Ahed Tamimi (b. 2001) is a powerhouse.

A Palestinian activist from the village of Nabi Saleh in the West Bank, she has been fighting against occupation alongside her family since she could walk.

Ahed is currently in Israeli prison for the crime of slapping an Israeli soldier-- hours after another soldier had shot her 15-year-old cousin Muhammad in the head at a nonviolent protest.

The entire Tamimi family is known for its unarmed resistance to Israel’s encroachment on their village of Nabi Saleh.

Rosa

charcoal on paper

21.5’’ by 35’’

available

Rosa Luxemburg (b. 1871; d. 1919) was a Polish-born German revolutionary Marxist known as a theorist, writer, and activist. Writing through the decades leading up to the successful Russian revolution and her own country’s failed German revolution, she authored books and pamphlets that helped to explain the inner workings of capitalism (The Accumulation of Capital (1913); The Industrial Development of Poland (1989); among others) as well as books and polemics that argued what strategy the revolutionary movement should take (Reform or Revolution (1900); and The Mass Strike, The Political Party, and the Trade Unions (1906) among her most famous.

According to the American professor C. Wright Mills, Rosa "had one foot firmly planted in democracy, the other firmly planted in revolution, and her head very much up in the Marxist clouds of faith in the working class."

In1919 Rosa, along with her close comrade Karl Liebknecht, was murdered in by the proto-Nazi Freikorps who tragically were following the orders of her former party (SPD) whose liberal wing had conceded to counter-revolution.

Clara Zetkin, a close friend and comrade of Rosa wrote:

In Rosa Luxemburg the socialist idea was a dominating and powerful passion of both heart and brain, a truly creative passion which burned ceaselessly. The great task and the overpowering ambition of this astonishing woman was to prepare the way for social revolution, to clear the path of history for Socialism. To experience the revolution, to fight its battles--that was the highest happiness for her. With a will, determination, selflessness and devotion for which words are too weak, she consecrated her whole life and her whole being to Socialism. She gave herself completely to the cause of Socialism, not only in her tragic death, but throughout her whole life, daily and hourly, through the struggles of many years...She was the sharp sword, the living flame of revolution.

Berta Cáceres

charcoal on paper

21.5’’ by 35’’

available

Berta Isabel Cáceres Flores (b. 1971; d. 2016) was a Honduran environmental activist, indigenous leader, and co-founder and coordinator of the Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH).

Beginning as a student activist in the 90’s, Berta led campaigns on a wide variety of issues, including protesting illegal logging, plantation owners, and the presence of US military bases on Lenca land. She supported feminism, LGBT rights, as well as wider social and indigenous issues.

In 2006, a group of indigenous Lenca people from Río Blanco asked Cáceres to investigate the recent arrival of construction equipment in their area. Cáceres investigated and informed the community that a joint venture project between Chinese company Sinohydro, the World Bank's International Finance Corporation, and Honduran company Desarrollos Energéticos, S.A. (also known as DESA, see Empresa Nacional de Energía Eléctrica) had plans to construct a series of four hydroelectric dams on the Gualcarque River-- having breached international law (by failing to consult with the local people) in the process.

The Lenca were concerned that the dams would compromise their access to water, food and materials for medicine, and therefore threaten their traditional way of life. Cáceres worked together with the community to mount a protest campaign. She organized legal actions and community meetings against the project, and took the case to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

From 2013, Cáceres led COPINH and the local community in a year-long protest at the construction site to prevent the companies from accessing the land. Security officers regularly removed protesters from the site. In July 2013, the Honduran military opened fire on the protesters, killing one member of COPINH and injuring three others.

In late 2013, both Sinohydro and the International Finance Corporation withdrew from the project because of COPINH's protests. Desarrollos Energéticos (DESA) continued, however, moving the construction site to another location to avoid the blockade. Officials filed criminal charges against Cáceres and two other indigenous leaders for "usurpation, coercion and continued damages" against DESA for their roles in the protest, which was alleged to have incited others to cause damages to the company.

That year, Cáceres told Al Jazeera:

The army has an assassination list of 18 wanted human rights fighters with my name at the top. I want to live, there are many things I still want to do in this world but I have never once considered giving up fighting for our territory, for a life with dignity, because our fight is legitimate. I take lots of care but in the end, in this country where there is total impunity I am vulnerable... When they want to kill me, they will do it.

In 2015 she won the Goldman Environmental Prize for "a grassroots campaign that successfully pressured the world’s largest dam builder to pull out of the Agua Zarca Dam" at the Río Gualcarque.

In 2016, at the age of 44, she was assassinated in her home by armed intruders, after years of threats against her life. A former soldier with the US-trained special forces units of the Honduran military asserted that Caceres' name was on their hitlist months before her assassination. As of February 2017 three of the eight arrested people were linked to the US-trained elite military troops of which two had been trained at Fort Benning, Georgia, USA the former School of the Americas (SOA), renamed WHINSEC, linked to thousands of murders and human right violations by its graduates in Latin America.

Her murder was followed by those of two more activists within the same month.

Jeremy

charcoal on paper

21.5’’ by 35’’

available

Jeremy Okai Davis is a painter living in Portland, Oregon. Much of his work is vibrantly colored, pixel-inspired portraiture. Check out his work at http://work.jeremyokaidavis.com/

Yaser Murtaja

charcoal on paper

21.5’’ by 35’’

available

Yaser Murtaja (b. 1987; d. 2018) was a Palestinian video journalist and photographer from the Gaza Strip.

Murtaja was the co-founder of Ain Media Production Company, which produced video for several international media outlets. Murtaja's journalism focused on covering life in Gaza, covering the Blockade of the Gaza Strip and the Gaza–Israel conflict. He was known for his work on Al Jazeera's Gaza: Surviving Shujayea. The documentary covers Bisan Daher after she survived an Israeli attack on Gaza's Shujayea neighborhood that killed six members of her family.

Murtaja worked as an assistant cameraman on Ai Wei Wei's documentary film, Human Flow. He was also a videographer for Ai Weiwei's Journey of Laziz, a video installation shown in a temporary exhibit at The Israel Museum. He worked with filmmaker Alsharif on "Ouroboros," a film about life in Gaza which premiered at the Locarno Festival in 2017.

Gaza is one of the world's most densely populated areas, with more than 5,000 inhabitants per square kilometre. The Gaza Strip is smaller than the city of Oslo but is home to three times as many people. The population is expected to rise to 2.1 million by 2020. 7 out of 10 Palestinians in Gaza are registered as refugees, and many of these come from families who were forced to leave their villages in 1948. Many have also been forced to leave their homes due to war and violence.

A 2012 UN report predicted the Palestinian enclave would be “unliveable” by 2020 if nothing was done to ease the blockade, but in June 2017 a UN report on living conditions in Gaza stated that all the indicators are going in the wrong direction and that deadline is actually approaching even faster than earlier predicted.

Israel has imposed movement restrictions on the Gaza Strip since the early 1990’s, leaving nearly two million Palestinians in Gaza remain ‘locked in’, denied free access to the remainder of the territory and the outside world. The isolation of Gaza has been exacerbated by restrictions imposed by the Egyptian authorities on Rafah, its single passengers crossing.

In March 2018, under a photo of Gaza's port, Murtaja wrote: "I hope the day that I can take this image when I am in the sky instead of on the ground will come! My name is Yaser, I am 30 years old, live in Gaza City and I have never travelled before in my life!"

On April 6, 2018, Murtaja was covering "The Great March of Return," a six-week campaign of grassroots protests that started March 30 demanding that Palestinian refugees and their descendants be allowed to return to their homeland from which they had to flee during the "Nakba" ("Catastrophe") of 1948, when Israeli armies expelled 700,000 Palestinians and destroyed over 400 Palestinian cities and towns.

Israeli snipers shot and killed Murtaja, even though he was wearing a jacket clearly marked ”PRESS.”

Since March 30 Israeli forces have killed at least 30 Palestinians at the Gaza March of Return protests.

Israel's use of deadly force has been condemned by human rights organizations, including Human Rights Watch, B'Tselem,and Amnesty International, and criticized by United Nations officials.

Murtaja was married and had one child.

Erica Garner

charcoal on paper

21.5’’ by 35’’

available

Erica Garner is the daughter of Eric Garner, who was murdered by police in New York for selling loose cigarettes, and whose famous last words “I can’t breathe” became a rallying cry for the Black Lives Matter movement.

“I felt the same pain that my father felt on that day when he was screaming, ‘I can’t breathe,’” Erica had said. “When he was saying that he was tired of being harassed.”

Erica became an activist following her father’s death, and came to be a prominent organizer for Black Lives Matter, organizing rallies, die-ins and meetings, and relentlessly fighting against police brutality and for justice for her father.

She died at the age of 27 on December 30, 2017 from a heart attack.

The Rev. Al Sharpton, head of the National Action Network, who delivered the eulogy at First Corinthian Baptist Church in Harlem, said that Ms. Garner’s strongest legacy was "turning her pain into power:”

When her father died, an activist was born. You don’t just accept injustice, you fight.

Her heart was attacked in 2014 when her daddy was choked and begged 11 times for his life and they would never let the grip go. When she saw the tape of her father, that’s when her heart was broken. Whatever attack came came to the pieces that were left.

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